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  • M6360 Cicero, De Inventione, in Latin, single leaf from a Romanesque manuscript, on parchment [France, second half of twelfth century]

Single leaf with almost complete single column of 37 lines (with parts of book I, 70-77 of the text) in a good and legible early bookhand with a strong ‘st’ligature, a hairline ‘ct’ ligature and a few biting curves, capitals in larger ornate script set in margin, trimmed at edges with losses to a single line at topand part of lowermost line, one later annotation in margin, stains at edges and small tears and stitch-holes from reuse as pastedown in binding of laterbook, overall in good and presentable condition and on fine and heavy parchment, 157 by 135mm.

This is Cicero’s earliest extant work, and the least likely survival of all his extant compositions. It sets out the art of oratory in four books (of which only the initial two exist today), and was clearly written early in his youth. It is cited by him in his De Oratore as youthful folly unworthy of his later style, and Quintilian informs us that in later life Cicero condemned the work as obsolete. Complete manuscripts are known from the Carolingian period onwards (see Winterbottom I Texts and Transmissions, 1983, pp. 98-99), but they are exceptionally rare to the market and the Schoenberg database records none as having ever appeared on the open market, and only one in private hands (another twelfthcenturycopy, olim Phillipps MS. 3884, and now in the Bibliotheca Bodmeriana).
  • M6360 Cicero, De Inventione, in Latin, single leaf from a Romanesque manuscript, on parchment [France, second half of twelfth century]

Single leaf with almost complete single column of 37 lines (with parts of book I, 70-77 of the text) in a good and legible early bookhand with a strong ‘st’ligature, a hairline ‘ct’ ligature and a few biting curves, capitals in larger ornate script set in margin, trimmed at edges with losses to a single line at topand part of lowermost line, one later annotation in margin, stains at edges and small tears and stitch-holes from reuse as pastedown in binding of laterbook, overall in good and presentable condition and on fine and heavy parchment, 157 by 135mm.

This is Cicero’s earliest extant work, and the least likely survival of all his extant compositions. It sets out the art of oratory in four books (of which only the initial two exist today), and was clearly written early in his youth. It is cited by him in his De Oratore as youthful folly unworthy of his later style, and Quintilian informs us that in later life Cicero condemned the work as obsolete. Complete manuscripts are known from the Carolingian period onwards (see Winterbottom I Texts and Transmissions, 1983, pp. 98-99), but they are exceptionally rare to the market and the Schoenberg database records none as having ever appeared on the open market, and only one in private hands (another twelfthcenturycopy, olim Phillipps MS. 3884, and now in the Bibliotheca Bodmeriana).

M6360 Cicero, De Inventione, in Latin, single leaf from a Romanesque manuscript, on parchment [France, second half of twelfth century]

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M6360 Cicero, De Inventione, in Latin, single leaf from a Romanesque manuscript, on parchment [France, second half of twelfth century]

Single leaf with almost complete single column of 37 lines (with parts of book I, 70-77 of the text) in a good and legible early bookhand with a strong ‘st’ligature, a hairline ‘ct’ ligature and a few biting curves, capitals in larger ornate script set in margin, trimmed at edges with losses to a single line at topand part of lowermost line, one later annotation in margin, stains at edges and small tears and stitch-holes from reuse as pastedown in binding of laterbook, overall in good and presentable condition and on fine and heavy parchment, 157 by 135mm.

This is Cicero’s earliest extant work, and the least likely survival of all his extant compositions. It sets out the art of oratory in four books (of which only the initial two exist today), and was clearly written early in his youth. It is cited by him in his De Oratore as youthful folly unworthy of his later style, and Quintilian informs us that in later life Cicero condemned the work as obsolete. Complete manuscripts are known from the Carolingian period onwards (see Winterbottom I Texts and Transmissions, 1983, pp. 98-99), but they are exceptionally rare to the market and the Schoenberg database records none as having ever appeared on the open market, and only one in private hands (another twelfthcenturycopy, olim Phillipps MS. 3884, and now in the Bibliotheca Bodmeriana).

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